The Garden City

With skyrise greenery and world class gardens, Singapore’s lush verdant city landscapes showcase a nation with foresight and a deep abiding passion, not only for its natural heritage but also for the spirit of its people.

I’m proud it call it home. (For now😉)

Macro Experiment – Raja Ampat

An almost impossible experiment to shoot the creatures without built-in Image Stabilization hovering in water – for fear of damaging the corals.

Hovering + macro + video + lots of backscatter + no IS – not a good combination. Definitely not recommended and I will never do it again!

Music: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
The Nutcracker, Op.71: No. 12c Character Dances: Tea (Chinese Dance)
The Nutcracker: Scene XII – Divertissement, Dance of the Mirlitons

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Common name of the creatures, in order of appearance:

Banded Shrimp Goby
Robust Ghost Pipefish
Spinecheek Anemonefish
Porcelain Crab
Ribbon Sweetlips
Decorator Crab ×2
Bobtail Squid
Decorator Crab
Spiny Lobster ×2
Ornate Ghost Pipefish ×2
Shrimp Goby & Snapping Shrimp (symbiotic relationship)
Striped Eel Catfish
Translucent Gorgonian Shrimp
Black-saddled Toby
Satomi’s pygmy seahorse (smallest known seahorse in the world) discovered in 2008
Chromodoris Nudibranch
Barramundi -juvenile
Many-spotted Sweetlips -juvenile
Baby file fish
Blue Ring Octopus
Octopus
Loch’s Chromodoris
Blue Velvet Headshield Slug
Barramundi
Squat Shrimp
Ghost Goby
Cleaning Shrimp
Scorpionfish
Pigmy Seahorse
Algae Shrimp
Razorfish
Cuttlefish
Barracuda
Mobula Ray
Moray Eel
Slender Pinjalo
Wobbegong Shark
Barred Moray
Silver Sweetlips
Eggs of Spanish Dancer Nudibranch
Skeleton Shrimp
Pikachu (Thecacera) Nudibranch
Pigmy Seahorse
Orangutan Crab
Cuttlefish ×3
Pigmy Seahorse
Commensal Sponge Shrimp
Electric Clam
Skunk Anemonefish

Chasing Coral

Just watched this new released documentary from Netflix called Chasing Coral. It’s about how a group of filmmakers and scientists try to capture the global coral bleaching on cameras. It also tells your a lot about the coral and the whole ocean/ planetary eco system. In the end it’s nothing most of us divers don’t already know, but I think it’s important for people who don’t dive or know much about the ocean to see. And I think that should be EVERYONE. The corals and reefs really come to life and it’s so awesome and moving. This is what I want to do as well as a cause, to call for action and help chip in to turn the tide around in terms of saving our ocean. I completely related to all the people in the film, and can’t help but cried through the whole 2nd half. 😭😭😭

They also have very well thought-out call-to-action on the film website http://www.chasingcoral.com/ where you can pass the message around. You can also encourage the people around you to watch it as well.

The fight is down to us now. The diving we love, the food we eat, the life we are living, it all depends on you and me. And the corals – they don’t have much time left.

Beginning of the End

There’re a couple of events I have had the privilege of attending that I really felt like I was at the right place at the right time. And this year’s ADEX was one of them. Meeting and listening to Dr. Silvia Earle, Nobel peace prize recipient and 2nd president of East Timor José Ramos-Horta, and people like Brazilian filmmaker Cristian Dimitrus, gave me more than inspirations. It is after time like these I really feel like I learned like a sponge and grew like bamboo.

It’s either a coincidence or the editor of this month’s AsianDiver was following my social media interaction with some filmmakers. 😂 As all this talk about shark fin consumption and sustainable seafood has exactly been my focus for the past few months.

“腹下有翅,味并肥美,南人珍之” (明代李时珍《本草纲目》) There is this sentence mentioning shark fin consumption by “the southerners” in Li Shizhen’s Compendium of Materia Medica all the way dating back to Ming dynasty (1500s), southerners at the time being current Guangdong, Vietnam & SE Asia.

Shark fin consumption, however, has come a long way from being just a Chinese problem. In fact if you go to China now you don’t really see it that much any more. I myself have seen more restaurants in Singapore serving shark fins in one month than in all my 26 years living in China combined. Chinese traditional medicine, like many other traditions, is going through a really tough phase right now in China. There are constant debates going on amongst intellectuals regarding its harm over its value. As for shark fins, with negative media portrayal and celebrity endorsement, it has become a symbol of corruption and has been disapproved by most mainland Chinese for almost 10 years now. (In Guangdong province it is a different story. The list of animals that has been on their menu is even appalling to the rest of China.) This product, together with manta ray gills, are now mostly marketed to overseas Chinese decedents, among whom the traditional heritage is still alive and strong. After living in Singapore and Southeast Asia for over 2 years, I formed a habit of constantly comparing everything with China. It occured to me that Mao forcing China into cultural revolution and the destruction of Four Olds decades ago might turn out to be a blessing in disguise after all. (Many other gems of heritage destroyed during that time is another topic for another day.)

Yet shark products consumption is now epidemic worldwide. The situation is especially bad in Southeast Asia. Go to any Chinese styled restaurants in Singapore, chances are that shark fin soup is a dish proudly listed on the menu, sometimes even as a star dish. In some western countries the shark cartilage supplement pills are also widely available from big supplement brands, from which the source being covered up but no-less questionable.

And the worst of all cases are the HK/Cantonese immigrants in US and Canada, serving shark fin soup on wedding and banquet tables as a status symbol still to this day.

To address the issue we must find it’s real source. Instead of blindly blame China for shark fin problems, the video in the link below perfectly explains the problem in US. And thanks to people like Shawn Heinrichs and @sharkgirlmadison, more truth can be unveiled.

http://projectearth.us/shark-fin-soup-isnt-just-a-problem-in-china-but-also-i-1796519432

With all this being said, at the end of the day, when I look at the piles and piles of dead sharks in all these videos, I can’t help but think that we humans are draining the ocean of all its fish. So even if we leave the sharks alone, they might not even find as much food to sustain themselves any more. As with the prediction of many studies, by 2048 we would’ve emptied the ocean with all its abundance. We have much much bigger problems to worry about than just sharks.

But as a great man once said: All great journeys start from a single step.